There have been very few cases of COVID-19 in canines. COVID-19 is in the Corona virus family. Many of these viruses can be passed between humans and animals. This particular virus seems to be extremely contagious human to human, but not from human to dog. However, the questions still remains – can I get COVID-19 from my dog?

dog laying on couch with sock under chin

There have been a select few dogs that were infected by COVID-19 in the world, but none were seen to exhibit any symptoms, and none have died. These dogs caught the virus when in contact with a human who was extremely ill. It has actually infected more felines around the world. 

To this day, there is no evidence that dogs can pass the virus to humans! Human to human contact is the most common way people are being infected. 

dog laying on pet bed with ball possibly feeling sick

During this tough time, refrain from bringing your dogs to the park or public areas in order to protect them and yourself. Keep your dog on a short leash during walks and keep a six-foot distance away from people. Try scheduling doggie play dates with friends you know are being safe. 

What if I get COVID-19?

Overall, the chance your dog can catch COVID-19 is almost one in a million. But here are some cautionary steps to take if you think you or a family member may have caught the virus:

  1. Isolate the person who has become sick. Ask a neighbor to watch your dog if possible. Pet sitters should be willing to take the dog home with them, reducing their chances. Test the person who is sick to confirm if they have the virus or not.
  2. If you are unable to isolate, reduce close contact with your dog. This includes kissing their face and snuggling really close. 
  3. Wash your hands and wear a mask when you are around your dog. This will prevent contaminates from landing on your dog. 
Dog in dog crate looking at camera

If your dog does become ill, coordinate a Telehealth appointment with your vet or have a neighbor bring them in to be seen. If the test for your pet comes back positive, make a quarantine room with a gate (link to product) for them until they are no longer symptomatic. 

Start an emergency plan today for your pet in case you fall ill. This could involve an emergency fund, a trusted pet sitter or family member, and an emergency bag with all their favorite toys and essentials in it. Protecting your pet starts with you protecting yourself. 

Author

Caitlin is originally from Vermont and has been working with animals since she can remember. She studied Behavioral Neuroscience and is now Mastering in Animal Shelter Management in Colorado. Her hobbies include horseback riding, fostering animals, and hiking in the Rocky Mountains. She has volunteered at five different animal shelters and worked in three different vet hospitals. Her passions include animal health, behavior, and enrichment. Caitlin also spends time taking high-quality photos of shelter animals to help them get adopted faster.

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